Thursday, 15 November 2007

The seven circles...

Thanks to everyone for the welcoming comments. I've done 40 problems so far with just 21 correct, and some are pretty tough. But of course they seem easy once you know the answer. Some of them I've got the first move right, but didn't calculate the correct 2nd move for example, so have ruled it incorrect.

The first chapter of the book is supposed to be a bit easier than later ones, so I think once it gets so that I'm getting a very low percentage correct, I'll redo the set from the start a few times to learn them all. It's been quite enjoyable so far anyway!

5 comments:

Blue Devil Knight said...

Good to know they aren't CTB-level easy. I wonder how they compare overall to CT-Art and the like. Now I'm tempted to buy it, damn you! I need something to help me stay sharp now that the Circles are over.

Dean said...

For more experienced players they'll probably seem easy, I remember being amazed at seeing a simple knight fork in the first few weeks I started playing. I think doing it from a book will help visualisation skills because on CTS I'm always tempted to play the first move that looks right, then if I'm lucky and get it right, it's easier to analyse the continuation once the pieces have moved. A book is also handy to have around to do a few during lunch break etc.

Samuraipawn said...

BDK: How about the Polgar brick?

Blue Devil Knight said...

SP: I want something I can actually carry around. I looked over this Palliser book at Borders today and the problems look nontrivial. E.g., the 'warm up exercises' took me a couple of minutes to solve each. While it was hard to tell because they aren't in order of difficulty, they seemed about the level of CTB level 20-30. Which, in retrospect, is pretty easy for good players.

I want three levels of difficulty. First, very simple, one move, few pieces on the board elementary tactics (which includes mate as a special case of trapping a piece, thanks Tempo). Second, one move, more pieces still elementary. Third, 1-4 move combinations that involve very simple tactics such as removal of the guard deflection and the like. I'd do 20 every day from the first group, 10 from the second, and 3-5 from the third to stay sharp. I am now doing this by just using different books. Pandolfini's 'Beginning Chess' which is ridiculously simple good warmup. I want another like it.

Perhaps for category 2 and 3 Bain's book? How many problems does that have?

BlunderProne said...

I use CT-art 3.0 adn have lately been converting them to fritz so I can (1)use 3D view ( too lazy to set up a board) because this is helpful for OTB play and (2) playing against fritz even after the material gain is good practice to play while a piece up...I'm finding its not as easy against a strong opponent.

I also use Lev Albert's 300 "Pocket chess training" when I am at the GYM or Lunch ...it's my "at work/ at gym" book. These problems are all over the map in difficulty... pretty tough but a good work out.

The Polgar brick is thick! The mate in 1's are relatively straightforward. The Mate in 2's are the core of the book. These are relatively easy but some are hard to find knowing you have only one other move to win. I have not made it to the Mate in 3's yet. I carry this book with me to Doc's appointments or when I have to wait for a kid to be picked up.